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Overview

Dr Stuart McKie

Honorary Fellow


Affiliations
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Honorary Fellow in the Department of Classics and Ancient History211 38 North Bailey 

Biography

Stuart McKie is a Teaching Fellow in Roman History. He studied at Leicester (BA, 2010) and Reading (MA, 2012) before completing his PhD at the Open University in 2017. He taught at the University of Manchester for two years before coming to Durham.

Research interests

Stuart's main research interests are Roman social history, particularly the religious practices of the western provinces in the imperial period. His current project, which is an expansion of his doctoral research, explores the social significance of cursing rituals in the Roman west

School talks and outreach

Stuart is happy to give school talks on any topic related to Roman religion. Possible subjects include religious changes under Augustus, the development of the imperial cult, and the form and function of Roman temples.

He can also give talks on Roman Britain, especially the cultural and religious changes that the Roman conquest brought about in the region.

Publications

Chapter in book

  • McKie, S. (2018). The Legs, Hands, Head and Arms Race: The Human Body as a Magical Weapon in the Roman World. In Material Approaches to Roman Magic: Occult Objects and Supernatural Substances. Parker, A. & McKie, S. Oxbow.
  • McKie, S. (2016). Distraught, Drained, Devoured, or Damned? The Importance of Individual Creativity in Roman Cursing. In TRAC 2015: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference 2015. Mandich, M., Derrick, T., Gonzalez Sanchez, S., Savani, G. & Zampieri, E. Oxford: Oxbow. 15-27.

Edited book

  • Parker, A. & McKie, S. (2018). Material Approaches to Roman Magic: Occult Objects and Supernatural Substances. TRAC Themes in Archaeology. Oxbow.

Journal Article

  • Parker, Adam & Mckie, Stuart (2019). Hitching a Lift: Functional Context and Magical Symbolism in a Roman Linchpin from Wootton, North Lincolnshire. Britannia 50: 375-385.