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Current Research News

Sugar could help repair artificial human joints

We’re working on a new sugar-containing polymer that could one day help repair artificial joint implants like hip replacements.
An x-ray of a hip replacement

Rugby, concussions and mental health

The issue of repeated concussions in rugby is very much in the spotlight, with questions surrounding pitch-side assessments, players’ welfare and long-term neurodegenerative risks.
Rugby players in a tackle

Nazi Germany’s elite schools used British public schools as ‘model’

How Nazi Germany’s elite schools used British public schools as 'models' during the 1930s, cultivating connections with them through a series of student and staff exchanges, is revealed in a new book.
Nazi Germany’s elite schools used British public schools as ‘model’

Scientists call for transparency over military carbon emissions

Our researchers are part of a team calling for more transparency over the hidden carbon emissions created by countries’ armed forces.
A US military helicopter flies over a green landscape

Climate change might make winter bird migration a thing of the past

Experts from our Department of Biosciences think this is a possibility after new research found that some species of trans-Saharan migratory birds, like Nightingales and Willow Warblers, are spending as many as 50-60 fewer days a year in their non-breeding grounds in Africa.
Image showing Yellow Wagtail

Astronomers see white dwarf switch on and off

White dwarfs are what most stars become after burning off the hydrogen that fuels them. Now our astronomers have seen one of these galactic objects switching on and off for the first time.
Artist’s impression example of a white dwarf – in this image the white dwarf MV Lyrae – accreting as it draws in material from a companion star

Infrared light therapy might aid dementia patients

We’re working on a new infrared light therapy that might have the potential to help people with dementia.
Tracy Sloan, who took part in a trial study to test the effectiveness of the infrared light therapy helmet she is wearing.

Pioneering research of first published African American doctor revealed

We’ve found new evidence of the first known research paper to be published in a British medical journal by an African American.
A portrait of Dr James McCune Smith

Law professor to help review UK medical practice

One of our Law professors will play a key role in the review of professional values, knowledge and behaviours expected of UK medics.
A doctor check their records on a tablet device

Prestigious award for galaxy evolution research

Did you know that the giant galaxies we see today grew from tiny fluctuations imprinted in the very first instants in the life of our universe?
Professor Carlos Frenk has won the Royal Society's Rumford Medal.

Most detailed-ever images of galaxies revealed with LOFAR

Have you ever wondered what the heart of a galaxy looks like? Or what is really going on in a super-massive black hole? Well now, an international team of astronomers led by our very own Dr Leah Morabito, has revealed the most detailed-ever radio images of galaxies at frequencies around the FM radio band.
Merging Galaxies image, credit - N. Ramírez-Olivencia et el. [radio]; NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration and A. Evans (University of Virginia, Charlottesville/NRAO/Stony Brook University), edited by R. Cumming [optical]).

Breakthrough in supermassive black hole research

Professor Simone Scaringi, from our Department of Physics, has been part of an international study calculating the size of Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) by looking at their feeding patterns.