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Overview

Dr Alex Barber

Assistant Professor (Early Modern British History)


Affiliations
AffiliationRoom numberTelephone
Assistant Professor (Early Modern British History) in the Department of History +44 (0) 191 33 41051
Member of the Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies  

Biography

Alex Barber specialises in early modern British history with a particular focus on the intersections between intellectual and religious culture and on the transmission of ideas. He is currently converting his thesis 'Information and communication in England after the lapse of licensing, 1694-1721' into a book to be published this year. His next project investigates the transmission of scribal news from continental Europe to Britain.

Research interests

  • History of Ideas
  • Freedom of the press
  • Scribal news
  • The English Enlightenment

Research groups

Publications

Authored book

  • (Published). The Communication of Sin: The Lapse of Licensing and the Circulation of Religious and Political Dissent in England, 1690-1720. Boydell & Brewer.

Chapter in book

  • Barber, Alex W & Ingram, Robert G (2020). "The warr against heaven by blasphemors and infidels": prosecuting heresy in Enlightenment England. In Freedom of Speech, 1500-1850. Barber, Alex W, Ingram, Robert G & Peacey, Jason Manchester: Manchester University Press. 151-170.

Journal Article

  • Barber, Alex (2014). Censorship, Salvation and the Preaching of Francis Higgins: A reconsideration of High Church Politics and Theology in the Early 18th Century. Parliamentary History 33(1): 114-139
  • Barber, A. (2013). 'Why don't those lazy priests answer the book?' Matthew Tindal, censorship, freedom of the press and religious debate in early eighteenth century England. History 98(333): 680-707.
  • Barber, Alex (2013). “It is not easy what to say of our condition, much less to write it” the continued importance of scribal news in the early eighteenth century. Parliamentary History 32(2): 293-316.
  • Barber, Alex (2012). Information and communication in the trial of Henry Sacheverell. Parliamentary History

Supervision students