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Overview

Mr. Grant Jones

Portrayals, Perception, and Performance of Elite Lay Masculinity in Thirteenth Century England


Affiliations
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Portrayals, Perception, and Performance of Elite Lay Masculinity in Thirteenth Century England in the Department of History  

Biography

After several years out of education, I began my studies at Durham University’s Foundation Centre in 2015, and went on to complete my BA and MA at Durham. My MA dissertation explored how religious chroniclers portrayed the masculinity of rebels against Henry III in the 1230s and 1260s, and provided the inspiration for my current PhD Research, which is funded by a Wolfson Foundation Doctoral Studentship.

Awards

2020 - Wolfson Doctoral Studentship in the Humanities

Project Overview

My research focuses on secular aristocratic masculinity in thirteenth-century England, particularly its record and importance within contemporary society. It explores how masculinity was constructed in religious and literary texts, how knightly masculine ideals transcended these texts, and whether status (e.g. Royal or Crusader) provoked different expectations.

I am particularly interested in how the demands for political reform which dominated much of the thirteenth century in England became such fertile grounds for display of secular masculine virtue and honour, not least within the period’s extensive chronicle sources.

Research interests

  • Reign of Henry III in England (1216-1272)
  • Monastic History-Writing and Art
  • Concepts of Reform, Rebellion and Kingship, c.1100-1300
  • Thirteenth Century Anglo-Welsh Relations