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Overview

Dr Mary Hanley

Associate Professor

BSc, PhD Psychology


Affiliations
AffiliationRoom numberTelephone
Associate Professor in the Department of PsychologyL62+44 (0) 191 33 43239
Fellow of Wolfson Research Institute for Health and Wellbeing +44 (0) 191 33 43239

Biography

Research Interests

My research is focused on understanding strengths and difficulties for neurodiverse groups, mostly autism and Williams syndrome. In my research I have been particularly interested in social behaviour (and relevant socio-cognitive and perceptual skills) and more recently I have been focused on ‘Triple-A’ issues – these are difficulties with attention, arousal (sensory processing) and anxiety. I am especially interested to understand the ways that attention, arousal and anxiety interact with each other (and with social behaviour), and in particular how they impact on learning and school life for neurodivergent pupils.

Through the Centre for Neurodiversity and Development (for which I am the Associate Director), I work to ensure that my research has impact with the people, organisations and families for whom it is most relevant. For example, by delivering parent workshops on anxiety and producing (as part of a team) booklets on ‘Anxiety in Williams Syndrome’ which have been distributed throughout the UK, Ireland, the USA, France and Germany. Most recently, we have been developing an online training tool aimed at educators, to help raise awareness and understanding Triple-A issues at school for neurodivergent pupils (see Centre for Neurodiversity & Development website for further information). 

Research interests

  • Autism
  • William Syndrome
  • Neurodiversity
  • Attention
  • Arousal/Sensory Processing
  • Anxiety
  • Eye-tracking
  • Social Vulnerability

Research groups

Esteem Indicators

  • 2018: Seattle Club Conference: Co-organiser:
  • 2014: Conference Co-organiser: Neurodevelopmental Disorders Annual Seminar :
  • External Examiner MSc Child Psychology, Kingston University:
  • Invited Seminar, Department of Experimental Psychology Oxford University:
  • Invited Seminar, Kingston University:
  • Invited Talk, Japanese Society for Williams Syndrome:

Publications

Chapter in book

  • Hanley, M (Published). Eye-tracking and neurodevelopmental disorders: evidence from cross-syndrome comparisons. In Neurodevelopmental disorders: Research issues and solutions. Riby, D.M. & Van Herwegen,J Psychology Press.

Journal Article

Supervision students