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Overview
Affiliations
AffiliationRoom numberTelephone
Assistant Professor in the Department of GeographyS203+44 (0) 191 33 43509
Assistant Professor , Hazards and Surface ChangeS203+44 (0) 191 33 43509
Assistant Professor , Sea Level, Ice and ClimateS203+44 (0) 191 33 43509

Biography

  • 2019 - present: Assistant Professor, Geography, Durham University
  • 2017 - 2019: Associate Professor, Geosciences, University of Rhode Island
  • 2013 - 2017: Assistant Professor, Geosciences, University of Rhode Island
  • 2010 - 2012: Postdoctoral Researcher, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Pennsylvania
  • 2005 - 2009: PhD, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Pennsylvania
  • 2004 - 2005: MRes, Geography, Durham University
  • 2001 - 2004: BSc (Hons), Geography, Durham University
Research Interests

My research interests revolve around sea-level changes over varying timescales from minutes to millennia, with a focus on coastal inundation from tsunami and storms, land-level changes due to megathrust earthquakes, climate-driven sea-level changes during the Common Era, and the mechanisms of long-term sea-level changes, including glacial isostatic adjustment. Within these areas, I have a strong interest in the comparison of geological data with predictions from models and from recent direct observations of land-level change and sea-level rise (e.g., GPS, tide gauges)

Awarded Grants

  • 2020: Late Holocene Paleogeodetic And Tsunami History Of The 1965 Rat Islands M8.7 Rupture Area At Kiska Island, Alaska(£37775.70 from U S Geological Survey)
  • 2019: A Refined Land-based Paleoseismic Chronology for the Cascadia Subduction Zone, U.S. Geological Survey, £65839

Esteem Indicators

Publications

Chapter in book

Doctoral Thesis

  • Engelhart, SE (2010). Sea-level changes along the U.S. Atlantic coast: Implications for glacial isostatic adjustment models and current rates of sea-level changes. PhD.

Journal Article

Masters Thesis

  • Engelhart, SE (2007). Mangrove pollen of Indonesia and its suitability as a sea-level indicator. Masters.

Supervision students