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Psychology Impact Case Studies

Read our latest impact case studies from the Department of Psychology.

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Normalising Voice-Hearing: From Phenomenology to Clinical Practice

Durham-based research conducted by the Hearing the Voice project is serving to normalise - and thus reduce the distress caused by - hearing voices.

Saving Lives: Reducing Prisoner Suicides

Durham-based research focusing a long-term trend of rising suicide rates amongst the prisoner population in England and Wales.
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Seeing Solutions for Stroke: Durham Reading and Exploration (DREX)

Durham Reading and Exploration (DREX) is a computerised training app for the rehabilitation of brain injury-related visual field defects.
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Normalising Voice-Hearing: From Phenomenology to Clinical Practice

Durham-based research conducted by Hearing the Voice project is serving to normalise - and thus reduce the distress caused by - hearing voices (or auditory verbal hallucinations; AVH), a highly varied experience with deep significance for people's lives. We achieved impact by improving (1) the treatment of voice-hearing for over 300 people in NHS services in Northern England, via a novel digital therapy manual; (2) psychoeducation and therapeutic information available to voice-hearers, families and carers, through a major new online resource, Understanding Voices (viewed by more than 16,500 people in 2020); and (3) public understanding of AVH and unusual experiences via the award-winning video game, Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice which was developed by Cambridge based game design company Ninja Theory (in collaboration with Psychiatrist Professor Paul Fletcher).

Saving Lives: Reducing Prisoner Suicides

Against a long-term trend of rising suicide rates amongst the prisoner population in England and Wales, Durham-based research has contributed to a marked decrease in Self-Inflicted Deaths (SIDs) and has sustainably halted the previous upward trend. The mechanism of this sustained, life-saving change has been the application of The Harris Review, (published in July 2015), the quantitative research for which was led by Professor Towl. The government's response to this research informed a new programme of national training for frontline staff which was rolled out across England and Wales.

Seeing Solutions for Stroke: Durham Reading and Exploration (DREX)

Durham Reading and Exploration (DREX) is a computerised training app for the rehabilitation of brain injury-related visual field defects. Hemianopia (partial blindness for one side of space) is a relatively common consequence of brain injury; approximately one-third of stroke survivors have hemianopia, which means it affects more than 30,000 people in the UK annually, and 5,000,000 people worldwide. Use of the app increases general vision-related functioning and thereby confidence, independence, and quality of life. Through an iterative process involving NHS professionals, patients, and carers we addressed perceived barriers to use, and implemented changes that improved usability. With tablets being a more amenable technology to people with limited technical experience, having a multiplatform app has improved the reach of this vital rehabilitative aid, with DREX currently having more than 2,250 registered users.