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MSc by Research in Palaeoecosystems

The Palaeoecosystems group is currently expanding. We are recruiting individuals with an interest in pursuing an undergraduate internships or summer projects; Masters by Research; or PhDs. We are also looking to attract postdoctoral fellows whose research interests complement those of the group.

Masters by Research

We welcome applications from undergraduate students looking to undertake MSc by Research training. The list of projects in Palaeoecosystems is below.

New Research Projects

  • Do clades exhibit an early burst of disparity?
    (Dr Martin Smith)
  • Why do Cambrian organisms lack mineralisation?
    (Dr Martin Smith)
  • Using δ13Corg to improve the timeline of the Cambrian explosion.
    (Dr Martin Smith)
  • An improved Bayesian framework for global stratigraphy correlation.
    (Dr Martin Smith, Dr Matthias Sinnesael)
  • Cambrian cyclostratigraphy.
    (Dr Martin Smith)
  • All the better to see you with controls on visual acuity in Cambrian communities.
    (Dr Martin Smith)
  • How does morphology evolve?
    (Dr Martin Smith)
  • Reliability of phylogenetic results.
    (Dr Martin Smith)
  • Preservation of Permian fishes from the Marl Slate of County Durham.
    (Dr Martin Smith, Dr Stuart James)
  • Stable isotopes in archaeological deer through the Holocene.
    (Darren Gröcke & Karis Baker)
  • Experimental archaeology of agricultural crops: understanding ancient fertilisation.
    (Darren Gröcke & Mike Church)
  • Carbon isotope analysis of Carboniferous coals and plant fossils.
    (Darren Gröcke)
  • Stable isotopes in historical dolphin teeth: a record of human fishing intensity.
    (Darren Gröcke & RIchard Sabin)

Entry: via application form here and following successful interview. For subject specific enquiries please contact martin.smith@durham.ac.uk, and for general postgraduate enquiries contact: earthsci.pgadmissons@durham.ac.uk.

Duration: 12 months [or 24 months part-time].

Entry requirements: 2.1 Bachelor's degree or above (or equivalent) in a relevant subject.

Assessment: research dissertation.