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Degree type

BA

Course length

3 years full time

Location

Durham City

UCAS code

LL36

Ready to Apply?

Please note: Courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Applicants will be informed of any changes which we are required to make to course entries as a result of Covid-19.

Typical offers

Typical offers
A Level AAB
BTEC DDD
International Baccalaureate 36

Course details

There are several areas of overlap between Anthropology and Sociology, making them particularly suitable for combination in a joint honours degree. The BA Anthropology and Sociology course combines modules from the BA Anthropology and BA Sociology providing a comprehensive understanding of humans as social and cultural beings.

Year 1

In the first year, you take a selection of modules from across the two departments (i.e. Anthropology and Sociology):

Compulsory theory modules:

  • People and Cultures

and/or

  • Classical Sociological Theory.

Compulsory research modules:

  • Doing Anthropological Research

or

  • Social Research Methods.

Examples of optional modules:

  • Being Human
  • Critical Scholarship in the Social Sciences
  • Health, Illness and Society
  • Human Evolution and Diversity
  • Introduction to Criminological Theory
  • Societies in Transition (double module)

Year 2

Students currently select a mixture of modules from both Anthropology and Sociology, either split evenly or weighted towards one or the other disciplines, including compulsory research training in either Anthropology or Sociology as preparation for the final year dissertation module.

Compulsory research modules:

  • Research Methods in Action (double module)

or

  • Anthropological Field Course
  • Research Project Design.

Examples of optional modules currently available in Sociology:

  • Communities and Social Justice
  • Contemporary Criminological Theory
  • Crime, Power and Social Inequalities
  • Police and Policing
  • Self, Identity and Society
  • Sociology of Education and Social Inequalities
  • Sociology of Health and Medicine
  • Violence and Abuse in Society.

Examples of optional modules currently available in Anthropology:

  • Evolution, Variation and Adaptation
  • Our Place in Nature
  • Biology, Culture and Society
  • Kinship and Religion
  • Politics and Economics
  • Global Health and Disease
  • Sex, Reproduction and Love.

Year 3

You take a 40-credit Dissertation in Anthropology or a 40-credit Dissertation in Sociology in view of previous training in social research. Additionally, students currently take up to 60 credits of modules in each Department.

Examples of optional modules in Anthropology:

  • Specialised Aspects in Evolutionary Anthropology
  • Specialised Aspects in Health and Medical Anthropology
  • Specialised Aspects in Social Anthropology.

Examples of optional modules in Sociology:

  • Community Placement
  • Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry
  • Cyberculture and Cybercrime
  • Inside Out: Issues in Criminal Justice
  • Social Policy
  • Sociology of Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation
  • Sociology of Work and Professions
  • Digital Health and Other Devices (short module)
  • Feminist Anti-Violence Activism (short module)
  • Justice, Violence and Abuse (short module)
  • Race, Racism and Social Justice in Contemporary Britain’ (short module)
  • Sociology of Mental Health (short module)
  • Sociology of Reproduction and Parenthood (short module)
  • Youth in Crisis (short module).

Placement

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Study abroad

Anthropology

Study abroad or placement activities are not only enjoyable but can give a significant edge when it comes to employability. We currently have links with the University of West Bohemia (Czech Republic), the University of Iceland, the University of Ljubljana (Slovenia) and the University of Malta, with new opportunities being added every year. We also run a third-year Field Course module, involving fieldwork at our South African field site.

Sociology

We currently have links with the universities of Helsinki in Finland and Duisburg-Essen in Germany. Students can also apply to the university-wide international exchange programme with universities in North America, Asia, Australia and New Zealand.

Learning

As a student on the BA (Hons) Anthropology and Sociology degree, your learning will be supported by formal teaching sessions, such as lectures and smaller-group teaching in seminars and practical classes. You will shift from being a consumer of knowledge in the classroom to a generator of knowledge, ready for professional or postgraduate life. To help develop this independence, you will spend part of your time engaged in self-directed study, which will include reading, project work and preparation for classes. In your third year, you will undertake a dissertation on a sociological or anthropological topic of your choice, preferably one that overlaps the two subjects, giving you the chance to engage in a major piece of independent work.

Assessment on the BA (Hons) Anthropology and Sociology degree varies by module, but may include written examinations, coursework in the form of essays or research projects, and presentations.

You will be given an academic advisor when you start your degree, and will normally keep the same advisor for the duration of your studies. Where possible, you will be given an academic advisor who has an interest or background in both sociology and anthropology. Academic advisors are there to support your academic work by providing advice about such things as study skills, module choices, dissertation topics, and applications for further study or employment. As well as discussing your academic work with your nominated advisor, you are encouraged to make use of the Feedback and Consultation hours provided by academic staff during term-time. These Feedback and Consultation hours give you the opportunity to discuss your work with module tutors, for example to seek clarification on complex ideas, get suggestions for additional readings, and receive further feedback on assessments.

As a student in the Sociology and Anthropology Departments, you will be welcomed into the wider departmental communities, for example being able to attend an extensive programme of research-focused seminars in both departments, where academic staff, postgraduate students and visiting scholars present their cutting-edge research, which may provide inspiration for your dissertation topic and even future study or employment.

Entry requirements

A level offer – AAB

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – DDD

IB Diploma score – 36 with 665 in higher level subjects

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programme offers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

Science A levels

Applicants taking Science A levels that include a practical component will be required to take and pass this as a condition of entry. This applies only to applicants sitting A levels with an English examination board.

Alternative qualifications

International students who do not meet direct entry requirements for this degree might have the option to complete an International Foundation Year.

English language requirements

Country specific information

Fees and funding

Full Time Fees

Tuition fees
Home students £9,250 per year
EU students £22,500 per year
Island students £9,250 per year
International students £22,500 per year

The tuition fees shown for home students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and Bursaries

We are committed to supporting the best students irrespective of financial circumstances and are delighted to offer a range of funding opportunities. 

Find out more about Scholarships and Bursaries

Career opportunities

Anthropology

Of those students who graduated in 2018:

  • 89% are in paid employment or further study 15 months after graduation across all our programmes

Of those in employment:

  • 82% are in a professional or managerial job
  • Average salary of £25,000.

(Source: HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey. The survey asks leavers from higher education what they are doing 15 months after graduation. Further information about the Graduate Outcomes survey can be found herewww.graduateoutcomes.ac.uk)

Sociology and Criminology

Of those students who graduated in 2018:

  • 86% are in paid employment or further study 15 months after graduation across all our programmes

Of those in employment:

  • 79% are in a professional or managerial job
  • Average salary of £24,338.

(Source: HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey. The survey asks leavers from higher education what they are doing 15 months after graduation. Further information about the Graduate Outcomes survey can be found here www.graduateoutcomes.ac.uk)

Department information

Anthropology

Have you ever really thought about what it means to be human? If you have and you want to learn more, then anthropology could be for you.

Anthropology is the study of all aspects of humanity, from our evolutionary origins to our extraordinary social and cultural diversity. At Durham, we pride ourselves on the breadth of our research, learning and teaching, encompassing all aspects of anthropology, and influencing the wider world through research that has global significance.

For more information see our department pages.

Rankings

  • Top 40 in the QS World University Subject Rankings 2021
  • 8th in The Complete University Guide 2021.

Staff

For a current list of staff, please see the Anthropology pages.

Research Excellence Framework

  • Ranked joint 1st in the UK for Internationally Excellent and World-leading research impact (REF 2014).

Facilities

The Department of Anthropology hosts a range of state-of-the-art research facilities that are used and run by academic members of staff and their postgraduate students. Given our commitment to research-led teaching, undergraduates and taught postgraduates frequently conduct research projects using these facilities.

More information about our facilities and equipment.

Sociology and Criminology

Criminology

Explore crime, deviance and criminal justice as social issues.

Criminology is concerned with understanding crime, deviance and criminal justice. Criminologists ask, for example, why it is that some people are more likely to be victims or perpetrators of crime than others; how crime can be effectively controlled and prevented; and even how we come to define particular activities as “criminal” or not in the first place.

Rankings

  • 2nd in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2021
  • 8th in The Guardian University Guide 2021.

Sociology

Develop a sophisticated understanding of societies and social issues. In broad terms, sociology seeks to understand the relationship between individual people and the wider cultural and institutional contexts within which they live. In doing so, it strives not only to make sense of social and cultural systems but also bring about transformative social change, drawing upon the systematic study of social issues to challenge inequalities and to inform the development of effective, evidence-based policy and practice.

Rankings

  • World Top 150 in the QS World University Subject Rankings for Social Policy and Administration 2021.

For more information see our department pages.

Staff

For a current list of staff, please see the Department of Sociology pages.

Facilities

Our Departmental buildings are located in the centre of Durham City and we teach, supervise and meet students in these. Our main office building is in 32 Old Elvet and includes a student common space, networked computer access and our main teaching and learning offices. Our University library is one of the best in northern Britain and is well resourced with books, ebooks and journals supporting all of our areas of study. College libraries also hold copies of some of the main textbooks.

Apply

Find out more:

Use the UCAS code below when applying:

Apply

LL36

The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) handles applications for all undergraduate courses.

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